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Solar eclipse map 2017: Path and forecast for today's eclipse; what you'll see in your backyard

The solar eclipse today -- Monday, August. 21, 2017 (8/21/2017) -- will mean different things in different parts of the country. This map shows the eclipse's projected path and a searchable cloud cover forecast. Use this map to check cloud cover along the path of the solar eclipse.

How to use this 2017 solar eclipse map and forecast: Click on any location included in the map for more information when it's time to view the solar eclipse of 2017. Our eclipse viewing map was last updated Monday morning and you can use it today when it's time to view the eclipse.

The Great American Eclipse -- or 2017 solar eclipse, if you prefer -- has clear viewing winners and losers now that we have a forecast for Monday. 

Data from the National Weather Service shows that the pacific northwest, the northeast (including New Jersey) and parts of Appalachia will likely be the prime spots to watch the complete solar eclipse on Monday, with mainly sunny skies expected to prevail. 

Things get iffy across the Great Plains and southeast, where significant cloud cover could provide an extra -- and unwanted -- layer of obstruction to the celestial show.  

Using tens of thousands of data points from the National Weather Service, NJ Advance Media compiled an interactive map (above) that shows what percent of the sky is expected to be obscured by clouds on the afternoon of Aug. 21.

The eclipse will be visible across the United States from about 10:15 a.m. to about 4 p.m., depending on your location. In New Jersey, the eclipse will begin at 1:22 p.m., reach is maximum obscuration (about 75 percent of the sun will be covered) at 2:45 p.m. and come to an end around 4 p.m.

Whether you're traveling for the eclipse or just staying home, use the map above to see how the forecast for the big day evolves.



Mon, 21 Aug 2017 09:55:55 UTC


2 hurt in Route 206 motorcycle crash, State Police say

Route 206 was closed in both directions following the crash, reported at 3:57 p.m. Sunday

 

FRANKFORD -- A motorcyclist sustained serious injuries and a passenger also was hurt Sunday afternoon in a crash on Route 206 North, state police said.

The crash was reported at 3:57 p.m., State Police spokesman Trooper Alejandro Goez said, and both sides of the highway were closed for an investigation that remains ongoing.

The driver of the motorcycle was taken by helicopter to Morristown Medical Center, Goez said, while the passenger was taken to nearby Newton Medical Center.

Goez said the driver had serious injuries. He had not received information on injuries to the passenger as of 5 p.m.

Other details, such as whether other vehicles were involved, were not immediately available.

It was the second motorcycle crash in a 28-hour span in Sussex County.

Around noon on Saturday, a 36-year-old man was killed in Montague when his motorcycle veered off Route 23 South and struck a guardrail and guardrail post, Goez said.

Rob Jennings may be reached at rjennings@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @RobJenningsNJ. Find NJ.com on Facebook



Sun, 20 Aug 2017 22:00:15 UTC


36-year-old motorcyclist killed in Route 23 crash

No other vehicles were involved in the crash in Montague on Saturday, state police said

 

MONTAGUE -- A Montague resident was the biker killed Saturday in a crash on Route 23, State Police said.

Burton Meshnick, 36, was operating his BMW motorcycle on Route 23 South around noon when the motorcycle veered off the right side of the highway, striking a guardrail and guardrail post, State Police spokesman Trooper Alejandro Goez said.

Meshnick was pronounced dead at the scene.

No other vehicles were involved and an investigation is ongoing, Goez said.

Rob Jennings may be reached at rjennings@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @RobJenningsNJ. Find NJ.com on Facebook



Sun, 20 Aug 2017 19:29:50 UTC


Made in Jersey: Before Madden, this was armchair quarterbacking

It was the game where you controlled the action, sort of. In 1948, Norman Sas of Alpine, N.J., came up with a game that most every male child (and, some girls) played -- electric football. An employee at the Sas family company, Tudor Metal Products, had tinkered with vibrating electric games in the 1940s, but Sas' brainstorm of applying...

It was the game where you controlled the action, sort of.

In 1948, Norman Sas of Alpine, N.J., came up with a game that most every male child (and, some girls) played -- electric football.

An employee at the Sas family company, Tudor Metal Products, had tinkered with vibrating electric games in the 1940s, but Sas' brainstorm of applying it to football led to the development of a toy that remained popular into the 1980s.

It was a simple but ingenious concept, requiring almost no changes from its invention through the decades of sales that followed. Players with small plastic "brushes" on their bases were lined up on a metal playing field. When everything was set up, the flick of a switch started the field vibrating, making the players move forward, at least when the game was new.

electricfootball02.jpgNorman Sas, far right, in 1971 with electric football fans, including Pete Rozelle, second from left. 

The play ended when a player on the defense came in contact with the ball carrier, the "ball " being a football-shaped piece of felt that fit in his plastic arm. The game itself often ended when player figures with older, worn-out bases began moving backward or in endless circles.

Over the years, the game evolved, with quarterbacks and their spring-loaded arms able to throw the ball (pass complete if it hit an eligible receiver) and spring-loaded kickers able to attempt field goals. Attachments that replicated scoreboards, clocks and even fans were included in later versions.

By 1967, Sas had signed a deal with the National Football League to add official team colors and logos. More than 40 million versions of the game were sold over the years with perhaps just as many little felt 'footballs' lost and eventually replaced with wadded-up paper.

Sas died in 2012, and was posthumously inducted into the Miniature Football Coaches Association Hall of Fame.

Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.



Sun, 20 Aug 2017 11:00:00 UTC


Motorcyclist killed in Route 23 crash, authorities say

Road reopened after earlier fatal crash.

MONTAGUE -- A motorcyclist died in a crash Saturday on Route 23 in Montague, New Jersey State Police said.

The wreck occurred around noon, near Clove Road, according to Trooper Alejandro Goez, a State Police spokesman.

The crash appeared to only involve the motorcycle, the spokesman said. Police did not yet release the name of the motorcyclist.

State Police reopened the roadway after lanes were blocked for an investigation. Additional details were not immediately available.

Noah Cohen may be reached at ncohen@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @noahycFind NJ.com on Facebook.

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Sat, 19 Aug 2017 20:54:00 UTC